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The 2016 -2017 youth alcohol prevention Parent Communication Campaign "Be Their Guide. Don't Provide" has launched! Look for this poster around your community!!!

“If you can quit for a day, you can quit for a lifetime.” – Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Addiction is never something that a person wants in life, it kind of just happens in the blink of an eye. Many Americans struggle from the same addiction for years, and can never seem to get into recovery. I was one of these Americans that got caught into the addiction of drugs, alcohol, and sex. Before my addiction years, I was known as a very respectable young teenager who played sports, joined boy scouts, went to church, did my best in school, and treated my parents with all the respect I could offer them. 

St. Patrick’s Day is a holiday known for good music, delicious food and fun. And excess drinking. Your kids are watching – or they could be participating.

Contrary to popular belief, kids do listen to their parents. What you say and how you act matters! Holidays like St. Paddy’s Day are a great opportunity to talk with your teen about alcohol and begin shaping healthier behaviors.

Why?
What are the Consequences of Underage Drinking?

Youth who drink alcohol are more likely to experience:

• School problems, such as higher absence and poor or failing grades.
• Social problems, such as fighting and lack of participation in youth activities.
• Legal problems, such as arrest for driving or physically hurting someone while drunk.
• Physical problems, such as hangovers or illnesses.

Many adults who drink alcohol do so responsibly. Be that as it may, many who are today’s parents drank at young ages and some lived through their teen years when it was legal to consume alcohol. Additionally, some families have well-established social traditions and customs which include alcohol consumption by all family members, regardless of age. Some parents simply do not believe that providing alcohol to minors is a problem. Yet, alcohol remains one of the most commonly used substances by teenagers.